The Measure

My mouth will tell of your righteousness, of your salvation all day long, though I know not its measure. Psalm 71:15

David did not know the depths of God’s salvation, what it all entailed, nor do we. God’s salvation is so deep and wide it is beyond knowing. What is available to us in that gift? What does it mean that we have salvation? For multiplied many believers, it means one thing: we get to go to heaven when we die. For a smaller number, it means a closeness of God through Holy Spirit in this earthly life through a renewed spirit within. A smaller number still testify to a changed life and ability to rise above former defiling, deadly behaviors. But the gifts of God are far greater in scope and potential than we have grasped. The unplumbable depths will never run dry so that we can reach into that well of salvation (Isaiah 12:3) to meet any need.  Strength? Wisdom? Courage? Healing? Ability to forgive? It is all there, and more.

Like Dr. Seuss’  McElligot’s Pool, there are worlds hidden from the surface view which lead eventually from that shallow pool to the widest ocean.

We may not be able to measure God’s salvation gift, but we surely should “open the box” to explore what has been made available to us. Relying on Him in every situation enables us to see more of His attributes and His character, ultimately giving Him the thanks, praise and glory He deserves.

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My God, My God

Increasingly I have come to understand that there is nothing random or incidental about anything concerning Jesus. Every action, every word has meaning and purpose. Some are obvious; others take a while to discover, but all lead to healing in some way. The things we don’t understand tend to slide right by; we dismiss them as incidental or fillers to the real story. But they are not.

So it was with his cry from the cross: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Mt. 27:46, which is an echo from Psalm 22.

Many sermons have been preached, interpreting this passage to try to make sense of it – and yet none satisfied. If God is totally good and behind the whole cross event, why is He so cruel to His own son during the height of his agony? So without a satisfactory answer we relegate this to a shelf in the closet to be ignored or explained away.

If it is true that Jesus took all sin to the cross, we need to rethink about what was included. Physical healing, certainly. “By his stripes we are healed.” “This is my body, broken for you.” My blood…poured out for the forgiveness of sin.” There is nothing that is excluded. Ailments of body and soul are covered. In the totality of His work on the cross, Jesus took all evil upon himself in order to die – to kill it, as it were.

And that included that dreadful moment in the Garden when separation from God occurred. Forced into exile, man was alone, terrifyingly alone. Naked. Abandoned.

Mankind has the ability to endure much hardship – wars, famine, floods and menacing beasts – but abandonment and aloneness, separation from the loving parent is the worst of all. It creates a pain and impress on spirit and soul which does not heal. A broken bone will mend; a broken spirit not. “The human spirit can endure in sickness, but a crushed spirit who can bear?” Pr. 18:14

Jesus’ cry from the cross, his intentional cry, was showing that everything, including the separation and abandonment was included in his dying. Therefore he could declare following his resurrection, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” He wont because he cannot. The old separation and its penalty have died; we live now anew in Him, never again alone and abandoned.

He not only suffered the deep forlorn-ness of God-separation, but there was more. “I thirst.” Here His cry reveals an essential body need, and the far greater longing of spirit and soul for the river of life. Man in his fallen state thirsts for that connection with his creator, for the refreshing found only in God. “Blessed are they who hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled.” Mt. 5:6

Jesus had throughout his ministry proclaimed that He was the source of living water. “He who comes to me shall never thirst.” “Come, all you who are thirsty, “ God says in Isaiah 55:1. “The water I give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” “Out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water.” John 4:13,14; 7:37,38.

Yet on the Cross, Jesus who is the God-source of unending life-giving water, cries out “I thirst.”

As intentional as all His other words, this declares that every misery sourced in the dryness of life without God is also hanging on the cross to be killed. Eternally. The new life planned by God will be one free of lack, and full of refreshment, catching man up in its flow.

It is this creation of a new reality, free forever from the former distortions, misery, sin and evil of life, that drove Jesus to the utter horror and pain of the cross where the “former things” were taken away. Killed dead. The new reality is indeed a new creation, one which required the elimination of the first state in order to establish the final and better one. It could only happen through the action of the God Man, Jesus. He, the sinless One, took all men into himself when He was lifted up, nailed to the cross. He also took not only sin, but every fruit of sin which brings woe and suffering in its wake.

The work of the Cross included restoration of mankind’s other senses. In Ezekiel 12:2 God declares, “Son of man, you are living among a rebellious people. They have eyes to see but do not see and ears to hear but do not hear, for they are a rebellious people.” Rebellion causes blindness and deafness, God says. The only way to deal with that is to remove the root cause, Rebellion, the first sin. From it spring the separation and then all other evils leading to death. Since rebellion is part of man’s fallen nature, it is hard to recognize in ourselves. But it permeates our thinking and self interest so that we cannot hear, cannot see God, and often don’t want to, anyway. We instead worship at the shrine of self (the Me, Myself and I trinity) wondering why our lives are not going well.

We hear about living a life without rebellion and wonder if such a thing is possible. Every thought and act in line with God’s will? That sounds like Utopia, unachievable in this life. And in truth, it is unachievable in the life we started with. It is only possible through the new life He created for us. Hence the need for the Cross. It is the door into an entirely new experience, a new reality, a restored relationship with God the Father.

His work was total. Complete. When He uttered, “it is finished,” He was ready to die, taking the whole load of ugliness with Him to the grave. No one else could carry such a burden; no one else has the capacity of love to do it.

It is finished. The new reality is now available. To you.
Praise Him forever.

All Men

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There is an old Gaither band song titled “The Longer I Serve Him, the Sweeter He Grows.” That is a truth. But I am finding the same thing can be said about the Scriptures. Many years ago I was, I thought, well versed in the Bible, having sat under the excellent teaching of several serious Bible students and expositors.

In recent months I am finding gems hidden in plain view as I read the Word daily. I am learning to read each verse, each passage, slowly and carefully, asking questions as I do. No longer do I read quickly because “I know the story.” Somewhere along the way I started paying greater attention to what Jesus said. If He said it, He means it then, now and forever. It is truth. I have noticed that some of what He said has been taught or interpreted to have a general religious meaning somewhat different than the straight forward no-interpretation-needed understanding. Jesus is not confused. He knew what He was saying. I choose to believe it, and in that choice I am discovering riches beyond measure.

One example is found in John 12:32. “And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.”

This has been explained as being evangelistic. The preaching of the cross, talking about Jesus’ death, will draw people to faith and conversion. We just need to lift up the story of the cross to those who have not heard, and they will be drawn to Jesus.

That simple explanation does not account for “all people” being drawn to himself. He said “I will draw all people…” Who will? Jesus. When? When He is lifted up. When was that? Good Friday. Where did this take place? On Calvary.

So to take Him at His word, all men, all people, were drawn to Him at the time of the Crucifixion. This makes perfect sense when you consider His death was once for all mankind. By incorporating all people, past, present and future, into Himself His death than became the one death for all. The huge sin burden and debt of everyone was loaded on to Him. Therefore His death, carrying all peoples of all time and everywhere to the grave, made it possible for anyone anywhere to walk free of sin.

He did indeed die for the entire human race. It is accomplished fact before we ever heard any preaching. Our part? Believe Him. Acknowledge our sin is now dead and forgiven. Rejoice that we were included on that day, that day above all others, when He was lifted up from the earth. If He had not actually done that, our salvation would be based on words alone, a shaky concept at best.

We can rest on the authority of His word. “And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” It is finished, indeed.

The Unmeasurable One

Psalm 71:15 is a verse worthy of memorizing. “My mouth will tell of your righteousness, of your salvation all day long, though I know not its measure.” Here in a nutshell is a truth we all need to grasp fully. We will never, ever plumb the depths and heights of who God is. We can measure, and study, and ponder all our lives long and be far short of seeing all of who He is. Beyond that, what is His righteousness, and how do we define it? The ultimate standard? The last Word? Or is it His holiness? Or His lack of darkness? We can exhaust ourselves trying to understand the inexhaustible God of all.

His salvation is another thing that is greater than our measure. Much of the church has reduced it to a simple formula “Come to Jesus and be saved!” In that reduction mush has been lost to us, for salvation incorporates His gift(s) to us which are without number, as He is. It is restoration, wholeness, purpose, dignity, delight – to name a few. When we begin to see just a bit of what that truly means then we cannot stop talking about it, just as the Psalmist said. “I will tell…all day long.” Far better to do that than trying to measure the immeasurable God.

Bent Backs

I am not the first person to note that some things are added to the Scriptures by Holy Spirit from time to time.  We KNOW that that phrase or verse was never there when we read it the 29 times before. Somehow, it was sneaked in and now jumps off the page clamoring for our attention, much like the little child who jumps up and down saying “Notice me! Notice me!”
My attention was drawn to Psalm 146, one of the great Hallel psalms of praise. I was reading it in the New English Bible, which is not my “regular” Bible.  Verse 7b to 9:

“The Lord feeds the hungry and sets the prisoner free. The Lord restores sight to the blind and straightens backs which are bent; The Lord loves the righteous and watches over the stranger; The Lord gives heart to the orphan and widow but turns the course of the wicked to their ruin.”
I had never seen this closely enough to have it register. What a promise!  Recently I was talking with someone who is concerned about a daughter with scoliosis. This promise has risen within me as a sure word, and an effective word to bring healing to those who suffer. Where the medical profession has few answers, God has the solution.

Praise The Lord, indeed.  Hallel, hallel.
It is also found in Psalm 145:14. The NIV has it as “The Lord lifts up those who are bowed down; the NEB says “straightens back that are bent.” 
A sure word from Scripture is one to meditate, pray and declare, to see those with bent backs, whether from physical or emotional oppression, stand erect once more.

Let the River Flow

The first half of Ezekiel’s 47th chapter is about one topic: a vision he had concerning a flow of water. This is a favorite passage for preachers as it contains much symbolism which can be developed in diverse ways. He notices a flow of water coming out of the temple. Just a trickle at first. The farther it goes, the deeper it gets. First ankle deep, then up to the knee. Farther out, it was up to the waist. Farther still, it became deep and wide enough to swim in, but was too big for anyone to cross. What started as a trickle had become an ocean.

Now this is contrary to what one would normally expect to see. If you have a swimming pool in your yard which needs to be emptied, you start with water, lots of water, multiplied gallons of water. Letting it flow out, you would expect that the farther away you get from the source, the smaller the size of the stream as it finds its way down the street, until finally there is no more.

With God there is always the unexpected, and there is always His desire for increase. This river pictures the New Testament revelation of the Kingdom of God. “What is it like?” Jesus asks. It is like that little bit of yeast in the dough, or like the tiny mustard seed which grows to become large enough for birds to roost in. It starts small and grows exponentially. Life from God will bring multiplied numbers across multiplied miles. First in Jerusalem, then Judea, Samaria and the uttermost parts of the earth.

As the revelation continues, Ezekiel sees “a great number of trees” on both banks of the river. Planted trees are symbolic of people, His people. (Isaiah 61:3; Psalm 1:3) The Life-Giving Flowing River now supports life in large number.

It continues on through the Arabah and on to the Dead Sea. The word Arabah denotes “the generally sterile valley of the Jordan.” Sterile, dead. Nothing grows, nothing lives on land or sea. Yet, when the River of Life flows in something happens. When it empties into the Sea, the water there becomes fresh. Swarms of living creatures will live where ever the river flows. There will be large numbers of fish, because this water flows there and makes the salt water fresh; so where the river flows, everything will live. vs.9

Please note “swarms” and “large numbers.” There is nothing stinting about God. It is all about greatness, increase, life. There are creatures on the once sterile land and fish of many kinds in the sea. Variety has always been a hallmark of the Creator.

Then he describes the trees. Not only is there a great number, but now he says they are fruit trees of all kinds, growing on the banks of the river. Because of the life-giving river, the trees are fruitful every month. There is no dormant period. They bear every month, producing food for all. The fruit never fails where the river flows!

All those fruit bearers are His people, His varied people. With each producing different fruit, every person’s need will be met there somewhere. If not this tree, then that one will do because His intention is that all will be productive, and all will receive nourishment sufficient to their needs from His life. If we abide in him (John 15:4-5) there is much fruit.
In addition to the fruit, these trees’ leaves have a purpose. Nothing is wasted in God’s Kingdom. The leaves, which never wither, are for healing. Healing! Restoration to the original good design. Back in balance, order, alignment, harmony. The cry of our hearts is always for healing – spirit, soul and body, to know and experience life in its fullness without malfunction, sickness and disease. Yet here it is clear that it is the very people of God who will have the answer to that cry. It is those touched by the river of life who have something within them to bring healing where needed. And that something never gets old. There are not a few special trees which have healing leaves; every tree has them.

This entire scene is a picture of inclusion and productivity, purpose and abundance. No one is left out, none is useless. This message is the same as that brought to Israel by Jesus when he proclaimed the Kingdom of God. It is His main message, the reason that He came. (Luke 4:43) God is near you; rejoice!

The vision in Ezekiel is a somewhat similar parallel to a scene at the end of Revelation. To compare and contrast them is enlightening. Rev 22:1,2    Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations.

Here the river is flowing in the very center of God’s perfect heavenly new creation. Flowing from the throne of God and the Lamb, and a bringer and sustainer of life, this river pictures the Spirit arising from Father and Son, and central to the city and His life. Verse 2 says that on each side of the river stood the tree of life! THE tree (singular) stands on both sides of the river. In the earlier vision, there were trees of many kinds; here it is one tree, yet on both sides. In our present world, a tree divided in two would fall and die. Obviously our view and understanding have to change here. The new scene has replaced all the varied trees representing all kinds of people with the tree of life, that very tree which was blocked to man after the Fall.

This tree, the tree, which bears fruit month by month covering all seasons. also has leaves for the healing of the nations. These leaves are designed to cleanse away all that defiles, sickens and separates. There is no people group, no ethnos which cannot be restored to the new creation. The provision is in God, supplied by God, sustained by His very Spirit or life-giving essence. Healing is the result of abiding in Christ, letting the Spirit of the Living God flow through us like a river.

Jesus is the Tree of Life on the banks of God’s river of life. The triune God dwells within us, according to John 14:20,23,16. Therefore, releasing His life to others rises from a true relationship with Him.

As we earth-bound humans become yielded to God, and conformed to the image of Christ, are we not then being transformed into Trees of Life? The fruit of our lives is not our manufacture, but arises from the tap root and DNA of the tree itself. Our continued walk of holiness and righteousness, based on the leafy cleansing of Holy Spirit witnesses truth and reality to all “nations” we contact.

Of course, on this side of the new creation, it is both now, and not yet. We are becoming life-givers, but not yet what we will be. As the River flows on, deepening, sustaining, changing all that it touches, we are becoming. Let that River flow.

Symbols Part 2

Jesus seemed to have a habit of making things be other than what they had been. In His first recorded miracle, at a time of celebration He changes water into wine. Then at the end of His earthly ministry at a dinner celebration He declares this wine is blood. His blood. And we are commanded to take it in within ourselves, sealing within us an identification with that Life which is in the blood. Doing so proclaims the gap is now bridged between repentant sinner and holy God.

Water, without which natural life is impossible, has been transformed into wine that now simultaneously becomes symbol of blood, life and death. Yet, more than symbol, the act itself of drinking the wine calls into reality the Life and Death of Jesus, source of all. The line between symbol and reality becomes blurred.

Water plays a large part of another Biblical truth. The rite of baptism, of being plunged beneath the waters and raised again, was affirmed by Jesus as He demonstrated His own submission to that act. When we are buried into baptism waters it is a symbolic union with the reality of Jesus’ blood and very life poured out. It was and is an act of cleansing, and a symbol of image

death to the old life before resurrecting to the new.

In a recent dream I saw a man of God I know standing beside a large baptismal bowl which has a continual flow of water moving over its top into a recycling system below. Only in the dream the entire pool was wine! As I pondered this, the symbol of wine representing death was merged with water and the death it represents. At the same moment, the wine and water symbolize new life. In a way too mysterious to describe, the wine of Communion, the Eucharist, plunges the partaker into the death of baptism and the death of Christ simultaneously. No longer symbol, the recipient now rises to new life, a life in full.

All of this consistently points to the reality of a God who is joined with us at every level – not a God afar off. He has incorporated us and taken us with Him into His death, His blood shedding, His life poured out for other’s sale. The phenomenal news is that when He arose, the resurrected life was completely new — and when He arose, we were and still are attached as it were with that new life available to us in Him.

His one over-arching command: Love one another. Because of the water, wine and blood, that impossibility is now possible. Symbol and reality are One.